Posts Tagged ‘tannin’

Norwegian egg coffee

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010


Egg coffee – a mild and refreshing drink that can be served warm as well as cold

I recently stumbled over “Norwegian egg coffee”. At first I thought it was a joke, but it turned out that this is indeed an “egg coffee” – coffee prepared with an egg! I have never heard about it here in Norway, but the fact that it’s popular among Americans of Scandinavian origin in the Midwest suggests that it could be something immigrants brought with them from Norway (feel free to fill me out on the historic origins of this!). I mentioned egg coffee to my mom, and although she had never heard of it before, she did mention that skin or swim bladders from fish were used when boiling coffee to help clearify it. In fact the Norwegian name for this – klareskinn – literally means “clearing skin”. The English name is isinglass (thank’s Rob!). Could it be that the fish skin originally used was replaced by eggs, perhaps due to a limited availability of fish in the Midwest? After all, both are good protein sources.
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Suppression of bitterness

Sunday, October 1st, 2006

I received an email last week from a supertaster (read more: BBC, Wikipedia) with an interesting question: Certain foods contain bitter substances that only a fraction of the population can taste. Examples include a group of compounds called cucurbitacins, found in melon and cucumbers, and propylthiouracil in broccoli. The question was whether these compounds could be neutralized by any means.

A very simple chemical that neutralized/modifies bitter taste is salt – and the best thing is that you don’t have to be a supertaster to test this. For a simple experiment, take tonic water, taste it and then stir in some salt (start with 1/2 teaspoon). Taste it again – if you can still taste the quinine, add a little more salt. At one point the bitter taste has almost disappeared! This principle might work for cucumbers and melons as well, but of cource there could be totally different taste mechanisms responsible for the bittertaste in the two cases.

tonic water

It might sound strange to add salt, but in Asia, it is not uncommon to eat different fruits with salt. I am aware of unripe mangoes, guavas and honey dew melon are eaten with salt, a salty spice and soy sauce respectively. Also – some people add a small amount of salt to the water when brewing coffee – this reduces bitterness and rounds of the taste. One last example is how salty food can make a young red wine with plenty of tannins more pleasent to drink. Tannins (polyphenolic compounds) can be both astringent and bitter, depending on their molecular weight (low molecular weight tannins are predominantely bitter whereas larger molecules are more astringent).

BTW, this has also been treated scientifically. See for instance: Breslin, P. A. S; G.K. Beauchamp, “Suppression of Bitterness by Sodium: Variation Among Bitter Taste Stimuli” Chemical Senses 1995, 20, 609-623 (link).